Thursday, August 30, 2007

FUSE ESB

My company IONA provides support on Apache ServiceMix via a distribution called FUSE ESB available from the Open Source IONA site.

What's in FUSE ESB right now? Well, it's roughly a distribution of ServiceMix trunk. This implies that FUSE ESB is released ahead of the Apache ServiceMix distribution (the latest release is 3.1.1, whereas FUSE ESB is based on 3.2).

Why are you using the latest trunk instead of the most stable branch? Well, mostly because our customers needs some of the latest features available. We take great care of what is in our Fuse branch: we do not necessarily backport all new stuff from trunk. We may also add some specific customer needs inside our own distribution, features that are not present in the trunk version.

So is that a fork? Certainly not :-) We have always supported Apache ServiceMix and we will continue to do so. But our customers have specific needs, so we may need to do custom development or have custom branches for them to fullfill these needs. Over time, we put the features that we consider generic enough back to the community. But this level of support can not be provided in a community driven environment such as the Apache Software Foundation. Let alone the fact that our customers often require privacy regarding their issues or their specific needs, environments and projects, so that it becomes difficult to use the open mailing lists of the community.

So is that a closed source version? No. The Apache License would allow that (quite the opposite of the GPL), but this is not what we aim for. Our process is quite open: as an example, I've recently developed an AsyncBridge EIP pattern for FUSE ESB (see the issue) that will certainly be contributed back to the community...

Hopefully, this blog entry will clarify a bit the IONA policy with respect to the Apache projects it supports and the relationship between FUSE ESB and ServiceMix. Feel free to download it and give it a try...

Monday, August 13, 2007

Switching to Mac

My ThinkPad has some serious cooling problems (it keeps shutting down when I really use it, which is kinda annoying, because this is when you really use it that you want it up and running of course) so I decided to go for a MacBook Pro. Why? Well, I'm a long time users of Windows, but for developing, I usually use cygwin for command line and all the unix good stuff. Additionally, all my team mates are Mac users, so I was quite sure I would not loose much. Now, I must admit I don't regret. Thanks to James for having pointed a few useful softwares...